Tag: timp

Ludwig Professional Timpani For Sale (Job no: 1390)

SOLD

For Sale a set of 4 Ludwig Professional Timpani with discs and covers.
[serial nos: 32″=5220, 29″=5218, 26″=5219, 23″=5126]

These drums have been in my workshop for a while now, which is too long for such a good set of timps to be unused.  Obviously this means that the price is too high, but all of my prices are just a starting point for the negotiations which follow.  So I am going to try an alternative method; you suggest a price and we can go from there…

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Those of you who read my blog and watch my videos already know that I am rubbish at remembering model names and numbers, I classify it as useless information, why retain it in my head when it can be easily researched if needed. However in this case, I think that I just told or learned the name incorrectly, so when I was clarifying exactly what to call the drums I discovered after many many years that Ludwig don’t even make Pro-Symphonics! They do make Grand Symphonics, but what the difference would be between a set of Grands and Professionals with the optional extra of hand hammered bowls will have to remain a mystery to me since they would both be made with exactly the same components. The answer of course would be the price tag. Anyway I digress; I apologise for getting the name of the drums wrong in the video, but the name is correct everywhere else.


What is in a name anyway?  It doesn’t alter the fact that these drums are in a really nice condition.  Equally, they rarely come up for sale second hand.  Because of the condition of the drums when I collected them and their inherent value, I decided that I had to do some work on them.  This work mainly consisted of giving everything a good clean (oh and isn’t that a massive understatement!) and going over the chassis making sure everything was tight. However I did have to spend a day working on the set up to make sure that they work properly.  Normally after all this I would put new heads on as a matter of course, but these drums are not mine and are in for sale not an overhaul. This is a compromise, and I know that they would sound better with new heads on, but this can be left to the negotiations…

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Above are some photos of the drums for you to have a look at, I tried to get the worst of the bowl imperfections visible. Below are some close up photos of the damage that I referred to in the video. There is nothing more I can really say about these timpani, for those who are looking for a good set of timps, proven over many years to produce a great sound reliably, you will know what you want and you will see that these drums are in great condition. For those who are thinking about other drums, well I would buy these everyday in preference to the gimmicky new crap that is popular at the moment – in ten years I fully expect that I will be doing very expensive repairs to those drums whereas in ten years, these Ludwigs might just need another clean and service. They are in my workshop available to be viewed, I can of course deliver if needed, and I will handle the whole transaction so it will be nice and easy to accomplish. To discuss viewing and prices either email or phone.

26″ bowl dent

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Bowl corrosion

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29″ bowl dent

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32″ timp disc
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29″ timp disc
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broken strap
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Premier Fibreglass Timpani Part 2 (Job No: 1357)

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In the first part of this job I looked at the restoration of the base casting and my approach to the repair. With the drums back from the welders I can now clean up the chassis, do the painting and rebuild the drums.

When I overhaul a set of timpani, there is a lot of work involved over a period of days or even weeks. My approach is to fix everything properly; I am after all a professional and that is what I am being paid to do. By, “everything” I mean every little detail, so in the posts on timpani I pick out examples of problems I encounter, rather than me filming and writing, and you watching and reading the same thing every time. For the same reasons I have coloured this introductory text blue (aren’t I thoughtful!)


Premier Fibreglass Timpani (Job No: 1283)

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Premier Percussion have been making their timpani with glass fibre bowls for a long time now. The actual production method has varied both with developments of available materials and with expertise. However one issue constantly raises its head – empty cavities around the bearing edge often leading to osmosis.

When I overhaul a set of timpani, there is a lot of work involved over a period of days or even weeks. My approach is to fix everything properly; I am after all a professional and that is what I am being paid to do. So I am fixing problems associated with the usual wear and tear, as well as “the dogs dinner” that the previous person made of the job. The posts on timpani pick out examples of problems I encounter, rather than me filming and writing, and you watching and reading the same thing every time. For the same reasons I have coloured this introductory text blue (aren’t I thoughtful!)

In this video I am looking at a 22.1/2″ timpani which has never been serviced. I guestimate that the drum was bought in the mid 1990’s. During this era, Premier still had its factory in Leicester which produced virtually everything, however factory assembly workers do not particularly give a shit about the quality of the work they produce, and I think that Premier suffered because of this.


As can be seen in the video, not only were there manufacturing issues with the drum but also assembly problems. The manufacture of the bowl istelf, surely is at the very heart of making a kettle drum. Everything else on the drums are just engineered components fitted into the larger castings of the base and the legs. Yet what I find time and again, and this is not by any means limited to Premier, are low standards of quality in production methods that in most instances are outdated anyway. Furthermore I often see massive resistence to change something that is problematical; is it resistence or ability?

On top of these (sometimes badly made) components, we have the additional problem of poor assembly. When I was at university in London studying violin making, my tutor told us that making the body of an instrument is about 20% of the job, the other 80% is the setup. What he was saying is that the skills of an instrument maker is making sure that the instrument sounds good and feels good to play.

However both problems really boil down to a lack of care in the person doing the work. This lack of care in the workers, is overseen by management who call it quality control so they can quantify it, presumably to justify their existence to the directors who can make decisions as to the acceptable levels of failure. Basically what I am saying is that the level of acceptable standards comes from the top down, so it is unfair to blame the low paid workers.

The majority of professional musicians I have spoken with about what instruments they buy and why, cite the drop in standards as the reason why they don’t buy Premier. Additionally most of them, including myself expressed great frustration with the company over this obvious problem. If they can’t get the quality, they may as well buy cheap.

There is an adage, from rags to riches and back again in four generations, and it sums up wht happens to companies like Premier, like Musser, like Adams, etc. The founding craftsman who makes whatever product cares deeply about quality and the business grows. Employees are trained and indoctrinated in this mentality. When the founder retires the business is sold, or passed to the next generation who continue the growth and the business blossoms. By the third generation there are no original employees and the whole mentality of the business has changed as well as the world in which it must operate and the business starts to fail… There are many, many examples of great companies ruined by the people who take them over, a few get resurrected by a rich benefactor with a passion. I haven’t earned and lost a financial empire (yet?), but I would still like a rich benefactor!

Adams Universal Timpani (Job No: 1263)

When I overhaul a set of timps, there is a lot of work involved over a period of days or even weeks. My approach is to fix everything properly; I am after all a professional and that is what I am being paid to do. However not everyone is as conscientious, and in the end, you get what you pay for. So when I work on timpani, I am fixing problems associated with wear and tear, and the dogs dinner that the previous person made of the job. The posts on timpani pick out examples of problems I encounter, rather than me writing, and you reading the same thing every time I do a set of timpani (which is why I have coloured this bit blue).

When these Adams copper universal timpani were brought in to be overhauled, the customer was complaining, amongst other minor issues, about the drums buzzing.  As soon as I heard the drums I knew what the problem was:

Adams universal timpani are built using the same method as Ludwig timps; the bearing edge is formed from a steel extrusion which is then fitted into the bowl.  In this case the bowl is made of copper, but the same process is used with their fibreglass timpani.  Fibreglass bowls are stuck to the metal ring with the same polyurethane resin (probably) used to make the bowl, however both Ludwig and consequently Adams have not used an adhesive but a mechanical fixing (pop rivets) to make the joint between a copper bowl and a steel hoop.  The big problem is that copper bowls are spun into shape, and there is always a discrepancy between the size of the bowl and the steel bearing edge hoop.  Spinning metal is a bit of a black art, so regardless of mechanical automation the size of the bowl will (and do) always vary.  Rolling hoops is also one of those things that is difficult to do exactly.  Therefore, this gap is almost bound to happen, so paper tape is used to fill the gap prior to riveting the bowl in position.

The principle of this method is a nice solution, but the application of the technique employed, by which I mean the use of packing tape, is not something that I would do.  Being brutally honest, I cannot give conclusive, evidence based, acoustic arguments as to why is it a bad idea, but my gut feeling (and experience?) makes me think it is.  There is a further problem of electrolytic corrosion – the copper of the bowl and the zinc plating on top of a steel hoop, are all joined with an aluminium rivet.  Now this isn’t a major problem, but why would you even introduce it into the equation?



The really bad creak on the 26″ timpani turned out to be in one of the tuning nut boxes.  This was difficult to find, and awkward to solve.  It is one of those problems that I will have to look out for when I do this type of timp in the future.

…How your timpani has gone from sounding good to bad.

(Every Percussionist Should Know…)
…How your timpani has gone from sounding good to bad.

My intention with this article is to explain how your kettle drum works acoustically to create a harmonic pitch.  I have simplified everything considerably for clarity and brevity.  Once the fundamentals are understood you will then be able to find out what has happened to your drum, and come to the realisation that you really do need expert help!

Right at the very beginning, Preschool Paul, whilst out walking with his parents threw a stone into a pond and watched the ripples.



Because this pond just happens to be perfectly round, the ripples bounce back off the banks uniformly.  It creates a nice symmetrical pattern.  When applied to your kettle drum, this would represent the perfectly pure note.  The stone represents the timpani stick and I know a timpani is played at the edge, but that is because of more advanced acoustical reasons which do not contradict this acoustic model.  The ripples are sound waves.

However, if the pond was elliptical then some sections of the circular sound wave would be reflected off the bank before other sections.  Your drum now sounds awful because the interaction between the original and reflected sound waves are inharmonic. (This will be explained in another article if I ever finish it!)  The same thing would happen if your timpani bowl has been squashed and you have a flat spot.

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However it gets more complicated, because we live in a three dimensional world.  In the diagram below, the drum looks circular when viewed from directly above, but as the image rotates around the centre line as if to view the bowl from the side, it can be seen that the top half creates the expected ellipse, whereas the bottom half undulates up and down.  This could be because something has dropped onto the drum from above.  At the bottom left you can see the “acoustic” shape that this bowl would create.

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Because the bowl shape doesn’t vary when timpani are played, then any defect in the roundness of the bowl will affect the entire playing range.  It is relatively easy to return an elliptical bowl back to round – I do it every time I change a head, however if the bowl is egg shaped things suddenly get harder, and if it’s not flat they become harder still.

Timpani don’t just play one pitch, they have pedal mechanisms that adjust the tension of the head.  Now we know how to get a good note, it is easy to understand that if the tuning linkages are pulling one part of the head harder than another, then acoustically, this is like changing the shape of the bowl away from circular and harmonic.  This manifests itself when the kettle drum sounds good at one pitch, but gets worse as you move away from that pitch.

However, timpani always sound better at lower pitches, so a 26″ will always start to sound a bit iffy at higher pitches because they are no longer capable of working properly from an acoustical stand point, and anything smaller just doesn’t work.  As players, you will probably agree with me in wishing that composers would stop trying to get timpani to play top A’s and above – they would be better using a roto-tom!

…The Anatomy of a Kettle Drum

(Every Percussionist Should Know…)
…The Anatomy of a Kettle Drum.

Life is easier if you can tell the doctor that your left little toe hurts, from there one could get even more specific; the top right corner of the nail.  It’s the same when customers talk to me about their instruments.  Most instrument are pretty simple, but the modern timpani are not, so I thought it was time that I create a guide.

Below is a drawing I have reproduced and altered from an old Premier spare parts manual.  I have only used Premier because I had it readily to hand.  Regardless of the make and model, essentially the component parts of a kettle drum are generic.

I can’t be bothered learning all the various names or numbers that manufacturers come up with to differentiate themselves from the others.  If you need a part, explain what you need, and I will worry about part numbers – you receive what you actually need.

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  1. Tuning key – this replaces the old T handles.
  2. Tuning bolt, not a T bolt – believe it or not they look like the letter T.
  3. Insulation washer.  I use PTFE, Premier have nylon semi-spherical washers.
  4. Indicies indicate the note or pitch on a tuning gauge (don’t worry most tuning gauges are simply rubbish – they are the bane of my life! (exaggeration)).
  5. Head, whether made of plastic or skin it is a timp head.  Skins were the thugs in the late 70’s that wore Doc Martins shoes, bomber jackets and had Nazi swastikas tattooed on their faces (I bet they regret those tattoos n6.  ow!)
  6. Bearing edge
  7. Tuning Lug.  Lug is a universal engineering term for anything that protrudes out.  I can’t stop thinking of the kid at school who had sticking out ears…
  8. Counter Hoop.  This holds the flesh hoop and enables tuning.
  9. Suspension Hoop.  It suspends the bowl.  Cheaper drums do away with this part and attach the struts directly to the bowl.
  10. Bowl.  Made of silver, copper, glass fibre, aluminium or ceramic, on timps a bowl is a bowl.
  11. Strut or Leg.
  12. Knee.
  13. Grip rod.
  14. Clutch.
  15. Pedal and pedal cover.
  16. Toe and more specifically the Heel.  Think about it, the toe’s stick out, and the heel is like that part of your shoe.
  17. Pedal Arm.
  18. Base Casting.
  19. Caster.  Premier have the Tilt Stem attached.  A wheel is a wheel, it’s the round thing, the complete unit is a caster.  Ask for a wheel, you get a wheel!
  20. Central Pull Rod.  Ignore all the clever names manufacturers come up with.  All the tuning rods converge at the spider which is attached to a central rod which is pulled down by the pedal arm.  Hence the name.
  21. Fine Tuner.  This changes location, on Premier drums it is called a crown wheel (probably because it looks like the Crown paint manufacturers logo).
  22. Tuning Rods.  These are the radial rods, the other ones are vertical rods.

Premier Series 1 timps (part 2) (Job No: 1228)

It is a long time since I wrote part 1.  This is what happens when I don’t get paid; all incentive to do the subsequent jobs fade away.  Then of course when I do finally get paid, the work has to be rescheduled.  In the mean time I have a hundred and one other jobs to do and the weeks roll by.  The other side of not getting paid of course is that I can’t buy food, or pay my bills, but that whole concept fails to register with many of my customers!

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Anyway, I digress (as usual).  So in part one I got to the point where the bases could be welded.  As you can see below, I have totally reformed and trnasformed the under side of the casting.

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Another classic bodge job is just bolting a caster on when the big tilt stem has been lost.  The caster was held on with a 10mm bolt, the hole in the casting for the tilt stem is 19mm.  I find it staggering that anyone would think that that was going to work.

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There is little that I can do with the resulting damage.  Fortunately, the casting is thick and the thread is coarse, so after re-tapping the holes, replacement tilt stems works well.  Easy job really if you have the equipment and the parts.  If you don’t have either, they shouldn’t be doing the job!

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Slingerland timp (part 2) (Job No: 1247)

The first part of this post can be read in 1247: Slingerland timp (part 1), in which the base casting was overhauled.

Now the casting is back from being welded and has been painted and re-assembled.  The leg wobble has been corrected with larger bolts and spacers to ensure a tight fit.  I replaced the link bar between the two legs with a solid strip of steel so they cannot become untied whilst the drum is being moved.

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With everything reassembled it is just a matter of putting on a new drum head…

However, the drum head didn’t fit the counter hoop!  The cause of the problem (and two and half hours of my life being wasted) is because Slingerland made the hoop on the small side, and Ludwig mad the head on the big side.

I learnt at school that if you multiply the diametre of a circle by pi you get the circumference.  Now I work with circles all the time, and I know that pi equals 3.14159 off the top of my head (it is actually a lot, lot longer, but to 5 decimal places is good enough for me!), but many calculators have a button marked π.  So why is it seemingly impossible for major manufacturers to make a circle of the correct diametre?

So first I have to make as much room inside the counter hoop as possible by planishing the rivets that hold the lugs on as flat as I can.

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Then I have to squeeze the head in mechanically, and use a hammer and block to seat it against the surface of the hoop so it sits flat on the drum.  Just look how tight it is:

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For me this is just another example of how so many instruments are made by people who don’t understand how important these supossedly minor details are to the overall quality of the sound.  If a drum head is too tight in the counterhoop it chokes the sound.  As it happens I got the drum to sound great, which took a few tricks, but was an unexpected surprise (and a releif!)

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Slingerland Timpani (part 1) (Job No: 1247)

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Looking at the picture above I have a song running through my head, “Oh, what shall we do with the drunken sailor?”  Those stupid little bars to join the legs together, they will go in the bin!

When I overhaul a set of timps, there is a lot of work involved over a period of days or even weeks. My approach is to fix everything properly; I am after all a professional and that is what I am being paid to do. However not everyone is as conscientious, and in the end, you get what you pay for. So when I work on timpani, I am fixing problems associated with wear and tear, and the dogs dinner that the previous person made of the job. The posts on timpani pick out examples of problems I encounter, rather than me writing, and you reading the same thing every time I do a set of timpani (which is why I have coloured this bit blue).

So before I get to the legs, I have to decide whether I need to raise the toe.

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In this case it is evident that the toe does need to come up a lot.  That is level, and the adjustable casters are at their lowest position.  With that decision made I can look at the legs.



What I did notice is how badly the castings were cleaned up (or not).

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Working on the mechanism is difficult because everything is riveted together, so these have to come out in order for the parts to be cleaned, inspected, etc.
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This post continues in 1247: Slingerland timp (pt 2)

Premier Concert Timps (Job No: 1246)

When I overhaul a set of timps, there is a lot of work involved over a period of days or even weeks. My approach is to fix everything properly; I am after all a professional and that is what I am being paid to do. However not everyone is as conscientious, and in the end, you get what you pay for. So when I work on timpani, I am fixing problems associated with wear and tear, and the dogs dinner that the previous person made of the job. The posts on timpani pick out examples of problems I encounter, rather than me writing, and you reading the same thing every time I do a set of timpani (which is why I have coloured this bit blue).

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So I did the usual process on this pair of drums: strip everything off the drum, so that whilst the castings are being welded I can work on the mechanisms.

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Then after the base castings are back and painted I can get straight into the rebuild and setup.  At the end of the rebuild, the bowls go in, and the heads are put on.  I usually do the counter hoops with the mechanism, so the bowls are the last thing I look at.

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Which is why it is so annoying when the PTFE tape is removed from the rim to reveal big bloody holes!

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As you can see above, these holes are deep, also notice how dry the glass fibres are (I’m lifting them up with the Stanley knife).  If you zoom in on the photo, you can see that there is a gap between the outer layers, and inner layers.  In fact, large areas were cracked and had to be removed, so the bowl ended up looking like this:

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So is this Premier not making the bowls properly, or customer damage?  Well it is a bit of both.  Yes it took a bit of abuse to actually break the outer layers into the void, but there should be no void in the first place!  If I had made these drums, even if, like these they were made in the mid to late 1980’s, I would repair them free of charge under “my lifetime guarantee” because they clearly were badly made.
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And finally, above is a very dusty, but repaired bowl.  Now I can finish the job and put the heads on, grrrr!